WITHAHAPPYREFRAIN said: the name also let’s those who identify with the LGBTQA community know this is an event where they can be themselves in a safe and supportive and welcoming environment, which the standard prom may not always provide

ah this is also a really good point that i missed out on

Clueless (1995) “He does dress better than I do, what would I bring to the relationship?”

allmymetaphors:

i used to be scared that i would never make a man fall in love w me because i’m too outspoken/aggressive/interested in radical feminist politics/independent, but then i realized that the kind of man who would rather I keep quiet and nod my head is not the kind of man i would ever let touch me or look at me or associate with me 

the single greatest scene in the history of cinema

Anonymous ASKED:
I want your opinion. Recently, my school's LGBT club held a Queer Prom which was a popular campus event. I have no problem with a Queer Prom, but I have to wonder if naming it that is completely counterproductive. If the goal of organizations like the Human Rights Campaign & NOH8 is to create a world where all sexualities are considered equal, isn't it counterproductive to hold an "unequal" prom? Why not just have the LGBT group host a regular Prom? Why does it NEED an exclusive sounding title?

Unfortunately, we still live in world where minorities need to have their own events in order to raise awareness and equality. Personally, I think calling it a Queer Prom is fine because it is run by the LGBT club.

I guess it’s kind of like Black History Month in that, of course we want all races to be equal in every way possibly, but we still live in a world that discriminates and therefore Black History Month is necessary. In the same way, I suppose calling it a Queer Prom is necessary because it has the opportunity to raise awareness, educate people, and just have a lot of fun.

Every prom is the run-of-the-mill “straight prom” (even though it’s not specifically stated, it’s almost always assumed), so why not have a Queer Prom? I don’t think it’s makes that much of a difference, and it’s definitely not counterproductive or detrimental to the cause. 

Message me again if you’d like to discuss this further, since this is a really interesting question. 

Update: ” the name also let’s those who identify with the LGBTQA community know this is an event where they can be themselves in a safe and supportive and welcoming environment, which the standard prom may not always provide” - Abby

'You've got a way of picking up things you don't quite yet own.'